The Dewar Cabin gets a facelift

Written by Davie Kean, master gardener at the T.C. Steele State Historic Site


Nestled in the woods just below the House of the Singing Winds is the Dewar Log Cabin. Because of its shaded location, the shingle roof didn’t weather as well as those on our other historic structures. It had become moss-covered enough to be mistaken for the original from the 1870s.

The most recent re-roofing is now complete and the fresh cedar shakes appear as a bright spot amid the bare trees. As I was helping the Sites Restoration Crew on the project, I wondered how may roofs the cabin had ‘gone through’ in 140 years. Shake shingled roofs can last from 20 to 60 years, so this may be its fifth or sixth roof.


We had the advantage of some sturdy scaffolding to make the job easier, and we certainly didn’t have to split our own shingles. I tried to remember this when my joints ached from working on the steep incline.

Although authentic looking on the outside, a lot of new technology lies under the new wooden skin — ice and water shield, black paper and a product that allows air to circulate between shingles and roof decking. Maybe this will help counteract the effects of moisture and shade.


As any homeowner knows, maintenance is never-ending, and the porch floor next in line. The oak boards to replace it have arrived, but, unfortunately, so has winter. Thinking about how the original builders had to contend with a lot more than cold weather will see me through the project.

What’s Doin’ at the Dewar Cabin?

Written by Davie Kean, master gardener at the T.C. Steele State Historic Site

T.C. Steele State Historic Site is a place of many contrasts. Here, visitors can compare an earlier way of life to their own, as they tour the historic buildings and learn of the hardships the Steeles faced upon arriving in Brown County in 1907.

The site’s Dewar Log Cabin presents another contrast. It is so different from the Steeles’ House of the Singing Winds, that it’s hard to believe that both were lived in during the same early time period. The cabin’s present location — about two miles from its original spot — is within sight of the artist’s sprawling Arts & Crafts style home, but in appearance, they are miles apart.

Selma Steele purchased and moved the little cabin in 1934, wanting to preserve it as an example of local architecture. She used it as a Trailside Museum, housing objects from nature found along the same hills and valleys painted by her husband, T.C. Steele.

That’s a bit of background. Today, artists and visitors find both buildings equally appealing. Proof of the cabin’s popularity was exhibited (literally) this fall at the Great Outdoor Art Contest on Sept. 11, 2010. The log building was featured in these winning entries:

First Place Watercolor: William Borden of Hanover, Indiana

First Place Teen 13-18: Luke Sanders, Fishers, Indiana

First Place child 12 & under: James Szalkie, Indianapolis, Indiana (also, the grandson of 1st place Watercolor winner!)

Want to know more about the cabin’s history and happenings? Ask a docent for details. Visit the site and make your own comparisons. Imagine yourself as the parents of 18 children living in the Dewar Cabin — or as a content couple entertaining and hosting area artists in the House on Bracken Hill.

Preparations for Celebrate Abe

vincennes_log_cabinGearing up for summer camp is always an exciting time for me. We “test” all of the activities and crafts we have planned to see how difficult they are and how much time it really takes to complete crafts. Last week, we made a log cabin using pretzels and icing. It was a fun and tasty day. Richard’s log cabin included waffle pretzel windows!

We have a lot of activities planned and there really will be something interesting and fun for all the campers! Just like the kids, each of us has a different day we look forward to.  I am really looking forward to taking the kids’ pictures in Civil War era clothing, and I was happy to see how well the daguerreotype case they will make turned out. I think it will be a great keepsake for them or — let’s face it — for their proud parents to have a memento of their child’s adventures!

Next week … we are practicing candle making! I can’t wait!

Celebrate Abe Summer Camp starts July 13. Space is still available, so sign up now!

Angela Lucas is the program developer at Vincennes State Historic Sites.

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