The Dewar Cabin gets a facelift

Written by Davie Kean, master gardener at the T.C. Steele State Historic Site


Nestled in the woods just below the House of the Singing Winds is the Dewar Log Cabin. Because of its shaded location, the shingle roof didn’t weather as well as those on our other historic structures. It had become moss-covered enough to be mistaken for the original from the 1870s.

The most recent re-roofing is now complete and the fresh cedar shakes appear as a bright spot amid the bare trees. As I was helping the Sites Restoration Crew on the project, I wondered how may roofs the cabin had ‘gone through’ in 140 years. Shake shingled roofs can last from 20 to 60 years, so this may be its fifth or sixth roof.


We had the advantage of some sturdy scaffolding to make the job easier, and we certainly didn’t have to split our own shingles. I tried to remember this when my joints ached from working on the steep incline.

Although authentic looking on the outside, a lot of new technology lies under the new wooden skin — ice and water shield, black paper and a product that allows air to circulate between shingles and roof decking. Maybe this will help counteract the effects of moisture and shade.


As any homeowner knows, maintenance is never-ending, and the porch floor next in line. The oak boards to replace it have arrived, but, unfortunately, so has winter. Thinking about how the original builders had to contend with a lot more than cold weather will see me through the project.

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